AndyHat (andyhat) wrote,
AndyHat
andyhat

So, I finished up the Novelettes on my list, and sent in my votes for the Locus Awards. Since most of my top stories ended up being things not on the Locus Recommended Reading List, I don't expect my votes will be particularly meaningful, but that's typical for me. Anyways, see my final choices here. So, the final update on my Locus Awards reading:

  • Novelettes
    • Very Good
      • Bailey, Dale. "Death and Suffrage". F&SF 2/02.
      • Vukcevich, Ray. "The Wages of Syntax". Sci Fiction 10/02.
      • Watson, Ian. "The Black Wall of Jerusalem". DAW 30th Anniversary: Science Fiction.
      • Watson, Ian. "A Free Man". The Third Alternative Spring 2002.
      • Willrich, Chris. "King Rainjoy's Tears". F&SF 7/02.
      • Wolfe, Gene & Neil Gaiman. A Walking Tour of the Shambles. American Fantasy.
    • Good
      • Webster, Bud. "Frog Level". Interzone 11-12/02.
      • What, Leslie. "Thanksgiving". Sci Fiction 3/02.
      • Wilhelm, Kate. "The Man on the Persian Carpet". F&SF 2/02.
      • Wolfe, Ron. "Our Friend Electricity". F&SF 6/02.
    • Average
      • Wadholm, Richard. "At the Money". Asimov's 4/02.


And now that I'm no longer reading with a deadline, more reading reports, now featuring my early attempts at providing more meaningful comments:

  • Anne Waltz. Swedish Lutheran Vampires of Brainerd. Sidecar Preservation Society, 2001. Short Story.
    • A great title, but the story itself is fairly mediocre. The plot concerns a group of Minnesota vampires trying to cope with the mundane problems of feeding themselves while avoiding hunters in a small town like Brainerd. They have the option of moving to the big city (Minneapolis, that is), but can they give up the small-town life? While it's definitely a different take on vampire mythology, the story takes itself way too seriously for the subject matter.

  • Edward Lee. The Table. Camelot Books, 2003. Short Story.
  • Peter Crowther. Cankerman. Camelot Books, 2003. Short Story.
  • Tim Lebbon. Screamology. Camelot Books, 2003. Short Story.
    • These are the first in a series of "chapettes" being produced by Camelot Books in Florida as promotional gifts for customers. The strongest (and longest) is Peter Crowther's story of a boy's nightmares, his cancer, and his parent's love. A sad, touching, and frightening little story. The Lee and Lebbon are both short profiles of deviant personalities. "The Table" is an autopsy table that was used for a murder/rape/dissection. The story is about a woman turned on by the idea of having sex on this very table, and a man she's met who isn't turned off by her desires. "Screamology" is about a man who collects human screams and is finally overcome by his hobby. Nothing incredibly original in either of these, but they both manage to pack plenty of distrubing images into their handful of pages.
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments